Save the Waves is hosting a film festival Friday, November 12th in the historic Victoria Theatre in San Francisco.  The second annual festival will feature a live performance by My Peoples before the world premiere of Dave Rastovich’s film Transparent Sea followed by a screening of 180 South.  Transparent Sea follows Rastovich’s journey along the Australian coast drawing attention to endangered whales threatened by over fishing, hunting, and pollution.

Doors open Friday, November 12 at 7 pm.  Film screening begins at 8 pm. 21 and over.

To purchase tickets click here.

Last Saturday in Nagoya, Japan the United Nations finally passed a global treaty that will ensure the protection of world forests, coral reefs, and a multitude of other ecosystems threatened by human involvement.  Delegates from 193 countries agreed to take “effective and urgent” action to halt the destruction of Earth’s precious ecosystems.  The hope is within the next decade there will be significant improvements to endangered environments and a growing number of land and water preservation reserves.

After two weeks of heated debate, prompted by non-profit environmental organizations, the UN’s decision to strike an accord may be an indicator that nation leaders are at last acknowledging the fast depletion of Earth’s ecosystems.  Environmental groups such as Greenpeace have been pushing for dramatic changes to the way humans interact with the ocean.

Greenpeace commented on the UN’s treaty,  “Alarm bells have been ringing for decades, and developed nations have been hitting the snooze button by delaying both action on and funding for environmental protection.”  Greenpeace hopes to eventually preserve

40 percent of the oceans.  For now the treaty has committed to protecting 17 percent of land and 10 percent of oceans.  This decision is a significant advancement considering only 13 percent of land and one percent of oceans are currently under UN protection.

In his opening statements to the UN, Achin Steiner stated “This meeting is a part of the world’s efforts to address a very simple fact – we are destroying life on Earth.”  Although passing this new accord is by far the greatest proactive initiative towards conserving the environment the world has yet to witness, it is only a baby step in a long climb towards healing our planet.

It’s difficult to believe that a force as tremendous as the ocean can be impacted by human pressures.  The state of our oceans have been rapidly worsening due to global climate change, coastal development, overfishing, and pollutants.

The EBM, Ecosystem-based Management plan, is a guide to changing the ways human influence effects coastal and marine life in order to restore the ocean to its’ natural state.  Organizations such as the Pew Oceans Commission, Compass, and the US Commission on Ocean Policy have called upon the US government to adopt EBM as a nationwide regulator.  The approach offers management plans and strategies to reform how humans co-exists and integrate with marine life.  A common misperception is that EBM will too aggressively restrict the way humans can interact with the ocean.  However many are unaware that EBM is already implemented key areas around the world  such as Chesapeake Bay, Florida Keys, Great Barrier Reef, Morro Bay, and the Gulf of California.

President Obama acknowledged the BP oil spill as a “stark reminder of how vulnerable our marine environments are.”  He has also been encouraging the National Ocean Council to use EMB as a regulatory plan to guide the US interaction with oceans. (LA Times)

According to yesterdays article “After the Spill“, featured in the NY Times,The House has passed a bill that would tighten environmental safeguards, require companies to furnish detailed response plans before receiving drilling permits, and reorganize the government to prevent to conflicts of interest that helped lead to the BP spill.”

Implementing EBM policies would not restrict human potential in coastal zones but limit the damages inflicted by our present way of living.

To learn more about EBM, check out Compass a group dedicated to “facilitate the communication of the newest science on these topics to policy-makers, managers, the media, and the other general public.  Their website offers insightful information about the current state of our oceans and steps we can take towards restoring healthier waters.

For suggestions on how to get involved and live by EBM policies, visit Seaweb.

Since launching in 2008, the Rip Curl Planet Foundation has donated over $313, 205 to environmental groups.  The foundation focuses on the preservation of surf breaks and funds educational and eco-design projects.  In 2006, Rip Curl Planet joined WWF to save coral reefs in French Polynesia.  The precious coral reefs that are vital to the balance and harmony in our oceans are threatened by pollution, overfishing, and the rise of sea temperatures.  WWF ‘s campaign based in New Caledonia has already resulted in listen 2/3 of the islands lagoon on Unesco’s World Heritage List.

Click here to visit the WWF’s US chapter website.